David Reid, 1996 Olympic Gold Medalist

One of the best memories I have of the summer Olympics came in 1996. My mother worked a second job on the weekends, from home, doing medical transcription. She had a desk in her bedroom for her IBM PS/1 Consultant computer system (had Windows 3.1). As she always did, she had the television on while she worked. My mother called me in to tell me that “the American is fighting against the Cuban”. I love boxing so I rushed in. I sat on the bed and watched as David Reid, from the U.S.A. was falling behind against Alfredo Duvergel. My eyes were glued to that television set. David was the United States’ last hope for a gold medal in boxing that year. This was an intense fight. After the 2nd round, I knew as did Reid’s coach, that the only way to win this fight is with a knock out. Halfway through the 3rd round, David Reid threw an overhand right and dropped Alfredo. The referee stopped the fight. Both my mother and I literally jumped to our feet and screamed in excitement. David Reid won the gold medal in the light middleweight division. He later turned professional and in only his 12th fight, won a world title.

David Reid, I salute you. You are the American Dream!

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Justin M. Salvato

Writer/Vlogger at Retroist
Seeker of 1980s nostalgia, rummager of vintage computers and player of retro video games.When not writing posts of The Retroist, I'm converting Retroist audio podcasts to Retroist video podcasts.My own videos can be found at www.YouTube.com/JustinSalvato.
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2 thoughts on “David Reid, 1996 Olympic Gold Medalist

  1. Atari Adventure Square says:

    Good stuff.
    My dad was an avid boxing fan.
    Would tell me all about Dempsey, Tunney and the lot.
    (in fact, I had an 8mm film of that fight)

    We followed and cheered Ali’s rising career.

    Was watching Olympic scandals doc recently and saw the 1988 Korean boxing debacle.
    Overmatched Park Si-Hun defeated American Roy Jones Jr in a biased judging decision.
    Both fighters were appalled, Hun apologized to Jones afterwards, and the rules changed after that.

    Reading about it, I was surprised to learn Olympic knockouts only counted as a single point. But it obviously helped if the other fighter didn’t get up.

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