State of the Art (Amiga Computer Demo)

Computer demos were, in a nutshell, programs written by programmers to show off their programming skills. Some demos were entered into competitions where they competed for prizes (and, more importantly, bragging rights), while others were simply released out into the wild for computer owners to enjoy. Both the Commodore 64 and Commodore Amiga were popular demo platforms. Computer demo competitions (“demoparties”) still exist to this day.

State of the Art, released by Spaceballs in 1992, was one of the most famous demos written for the Commodore Amiga. The Amiga was one of the earliest computers to feature stereo sound, and as you can tell in this YouTube version of the video, State of the Art takes great advantage of this feature.

The entire demo fit on and ran from a single Amiga floppy disk, and required a full 1MB of RAM to run. The year it was relased, State of the Art won first place at “The Party,” a legendary demoparty that took place from 1991 to 2002 in Denmark.

Rob O'Hara

I'm into old video games, old arcade games, old computer games, writing, photography, computer/network security, and of course, the 1980s!

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5 thoughts on “State of the Art (Amiga Computer Demo)

  1. Sort of. Video of the girl dancing was taken. Stills were taken of that, and the stills were converted into vector images. It took an awful lot of work to cram that entire thing on a 1.44 meg floppy disk.

    It has been said that this demo was the direct inspiration of the outline iPod advertising campaign.

  2. Hi there,

    Great demo from Spaceballs. I remember people being quite impressed by it, especially non-Amiga owners. I also like other demos from Spaceballs. Some of the newer ones from this century are quite cool, although completely different when it comes to style/design.

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