Behind The Scenes: The Road Warrior (1981)


I saw The Road Warrior and the very next year, Conan the Barbarian, in the theater for some reason with my Father, Grandmother and Grandfather. While my Father and I were quite pleased with both films…my Grandparents were less than excited about their night on the town. To this day I really cannot explain what my Father was thinking by talking them into seeing these movies with us.

Thanks to Quint though as always for his continuing awesome Behind the Scenes series over at Ain’t It Cool News. I particularly love this shot of Mel Gibson as Mad Max…beaten and torn…towards the end of the film. Director and Writer, George Miller, can be seen in the long overcoat with what looks like a pickaxe to me.

Thanks to IMP Awards for the awesome original poster for the film!

Here is a fun bit of trivia thanks to the Internet Movie Database: “Director/Co-Writer George Miller was given the rights to this and Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome to get him to step aside as the director of Contact.” and “Mel Gibson only had 16 lines of dialogue in the entire film, and two of them were: “I only came for the gasoline.”

VicSage

Editor at Retroist
Searching through the alleys for useful knowledge in the city of Nostalgia. Huge cinema fanatic and sometimes carrier of the flame for the weirding ways of 80s gaming, toys, and television. When his wife lets him he is quite happy sitting in the corner eating buckets of beef jerky.

Latest posts by VicSage (see all)

Subscribe to the Retroist Newsletter

* indicates required

One thought on “Behind The Scenes: The Road Warrior (1981)

  1. Atari Adventure Square says:

    One of the best action movies, ever.

    Only saw this on VHS video back in the good old VCR days, unfortunately. And then only in widescreen last year.

    Man, what a ride.
    There’s talks of a remake but I doubt the pitch-perfect delivery of high-octane automotive violence and sharp editing of the original (16 lines! Perfect!) can be matched with today’s chaotic (and perpetually blue-tinted) visual approach to action.

    I’ll still be curious to see the results.

Comments are closed.