The Girl from U.N.C.L.E on DVD

The Girl from U.N.C.L.E. was an American spy-fi TV series that aired on NBC for one season from September 16, 1966 to April 11, 1967. It starred Stefanie Powers as American U.N.C.L.E. agent April Dancer and Noel Harrison (son of Rex Harrison) as her English partner. The show was a spin-off from the more successful The Man from U.N.C.L.E.. It even used a variation of the theme music from that show. As mentioned, it was a spin-off, but the tone of show was much different than the original (at least when the original started — not later UNCLE eps). The show was filled with cartoony camp, most likely as a response to the success and influence of the 1960s Batman series.

I have very vague recollections of watching this show in the late 1970s and early 1980s on, off all things, a UHF station (remember those). In my adult life when the show has come up, I have strained to remember details and have wanted to watch the show again as are fresher, but I was out of luck. Until now, because thanks to the Warner Archive, I no longer need to strain and tug at degrading memories. They have released the full run of the show on 8 DVDs and it is available exclusively at The Warner Archive.

I rewatched the show and it is high 60s silliness, that I can see being a turn off to original The Man from U.N.C.L.E. fans, but for fans of the campy style of Batman, it is a real treat.

See for yourself.

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Garry Vander Voort

Editor/Podcaster at Retroist
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2 thoughts on “The Girl from U.N.C.L.E on DVD

  1. I’ve never seen this show but may have to check it out. I’ve been on a “silly 60s” kick lately. That decade is great for TV shows that didn’t have to have a message continuity from episode to episode. Shows like The Monkees, Batman, Gilligan’s Island and The Munsters are fantastic due to their silliness rather than social commentary.

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