LaserDisc Players: Wave of the Future?

Consumer Reports weigh in on this 1992 clip from a WGRZ Buffalo newscast asking if it’s a good idea to buy a laser disc player. The answer sounded like a resounding, No.

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7 thoughts on “LaserDisc Players: Wave of the Future?

  1. vinvectrex says:

    Okay, that was pretty negative. But, I was really expecting there to be something about having to flip the disc. Nope – I guess by the time this aired, that wasn’t an issue. The other drawbacks (price, and having to buy the discs) wouldn’t have been that big a deterrant for most videophiles. And, they didn’t go out of their way to make the laserdisc shine on the segment. Sure, they showed Blade Runner – but on a 19″ screen…

  2. Doug says:

    Could laserdisc be scratched? On a middle-school field trip, we went to COSI (Center of Science and Industry) in downtown Columbus. Either laserdiscs or DVDs were just hitting the markets. They had a disc that I think was a laserdisc; it looked like a DVD but was way bigger. It was the first time I had ever seen anything like that. The guy doing the demonstration said they were indestructible and threw it on the ground to prove his point. I know CDs and DVDs are not indestructible, so what was that thing?

  3. Patrick J. Doody says:

    I still have a LD player and occasionally buy discs for it. Back around the earlier part of last decade, it was actually a great thing to have because many great films were still not out on DVD – BTTF, Indiana Jones, even Star Wars – so LD was a good way to get those movies in widescreen – and for cheap!

    But now, you can pretty much get anything on DVD. Still cool to have a LD player though – I use it from time to time.

  4. Atari Adventure Square says:

    Went nuts for this format once it got to be more accessible (cheaper rental fees for a player and a few titles).
    The picture quality was crisp and worth the effort but it was the Criterion discs that made the experience a movie-lover’s delight.
    The commentary on the James Bond titles were jam-packed with insider info (so much so that the producers nixed their re-issues), the Aliens package had just about everything you wanted to know about the production details, and it was the only time I saw a reconstructed version of Magnificient Ambersons (with stills and Welles’ original script).
    Indeed, you had to flip the discs four times to get through a movie (with two-disc titles) so it couldn’t last.
    But it was a sign of thing to come.
    I’ll always love that period of filmic discovery.

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